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spiders and snakes invade homes to escape floods


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                After the forest fires at the end of 2019, Australia has now been in the grip of severe flooding for a week in the Sydney region and New South Wales.  To escape the rising waters, spiders and snakes have moved closer to homes, going so far as to invade homes, under the cameras of residents.  On March 24, the Australian Reptile Park warned of a possible invasion of tarantulas after the floods.
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                                    <p>Matt Lovenfosse, a resident of Kinchela Creek, south-eastern Australia, found his garden fence covered with thousands of spiders on Wednesday March 23:</p>                <p>
                    <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?height=476&amp;href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FMattlnf%2Fvideos%2F269586808005582%2F&amp;show_text=false&amp;width=269" width="269" height="476" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="true" allow="autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; picture-in-picture; web-share"></iframe>

<sub>Matt Lovenfosse posted the video on his Facebook profile on March 23, 2021. The caption reads: "Spiders and snakes are now in the garden and all over the house".</sub>

“The spiders have climbed on the house, on the fences, on whatever they can,” he told The Guardian.

In another video he posted on Facebook the day before, we can see a large body of water covered in spiders and giant locusts:

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A snake in a tree on March 24, 2021 in Kinchela Creek (Australia). © Matt Lovenfosse/Facebook
    </div>Start McKenzie, owner of the Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers company, which intervenes at the request of individuals to catch snakes that have ventured into their homes, says on Facebook that it has been overwhelmed with calls in recent days.  In a video published on March 23, he can be seen ridding a local woman of a python nearly three meters high which had taken refuge on his terrace:</p>                <p>
                    <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?height=476&amp;href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSunshineCoastSnakeCatchers%2Fvideos%2F2186945981435815%2F&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=267" width="267" height="591" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="true" allow="autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; picture-in-picture; web-share"></iframe>

<sub>Start McKenzie can be heard commenting at the beginning of the video: "Everything is wet, it has been raining all day."</sub>

Professor Dieter Hochuli of the University of Sidney told the BBC that during floods, animals that spend their lives hidden in the ground can no longer live there. They then try to establish themselves higher.

Southeast Australia is in the throes of the worst flooding the region has seen in half a century. Hundreds of schools have been closed, while 38 areas have been declared in a state of natural disaster. Clean-up operations began as the water began to recede.

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Source site observers.france24.com

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