Advertising boycott puts increasing pressure on Facebook – ICT news

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Facebook’s advertising boycott continues to spread. Companies are trying to pressure Facebook to make its rules on hate messages more stringent.

American automaker Ford and sporting goods manufacturers Adidas and Reebok are joining the growing ranks of companies that seem to be fed up with expressions of hate on social media. For thirty days, Ford stopped advertising on platforms such as Facebook in the United States. In other sectors, the initiative is still under study. Adidas and Reebok will boycott Facebook and Instagram around the world next month.

They follow in particular the example of the Starbucks coffee chain, the ice cream maker Ben & Jerry’s, the clothing brands Patagonia and The North Face, the Anglo-Dutch food group Unilever, the telecommunications giant Verizon and Coca-Cola .

The origin of this campaign is the way Facebook handles inflammatory words and hate speech, especially when it is expressed by politicians. The drop that broke the camel’s back is clearly a message from President Trump in which he seems to be calling on protesters protesting against police violence. For weeks, the United States has been submerged in demonstrations against racism and police violence, in response (among other things) to the death of George Floyd.

Trump’s post in question was deleted or tagged by other social media like Twitter, but Facebook kept it because, according to Facebook boss Marc Zuckerberg, it was not breaking the rules. Although her company has in the meantime removed several advertisements from the Trump campaign, it has built the image of the only technological site that does little or nothing to combat hate messages. Right now, the subject is particularly sensitive in American companies, which want to show their most diverse side through demonstrations and interest in the Black Lives Matter movement.

Meanwhile, at Microsoft

Meanwhile, an article on the Axios news site shows that Microsoft was ahead of the rest. Starting in May, the company stopped advertising on Facebook and Instagram in the United States. The main reason is not, as in the case of the current boycott, the rules that Facebook may or may not impose on its messages, but the placement of these advertisements. The tech giant was concerned that ads might be placed next to “inappropriate content,” wrote Chris Capossela, marketing manager at Microsoft, in an internal message Axios was able to view. It is unknown if there are specific reasons for this, but the message cites “hate speech, pornography, terrorist messages, etc.” as examples of inappropriate messages. In this sense, the boycott of Microsoft is somewhat similar to the previous actions of advertisers against YouTube, where it turned out that their advertisements were shown before and after inappropriate photos of children or videos of radical Muslims.

Microsoft wants to make clear that it is not necessarily involved in the boycott, but that it is in contact with Facebook to make changes. It seems logical that the tech giant should be a little more careful. Microsoft is collaborating with Facebook on a few projects. For example, it refers all users of its recently disappeared streaming platform, Mixer, to Facebook Gaming.

American automaker Ford and sporting goods manufacturers Adidas and Reebok are joining the growing ranks of companies that seem to be fed up with expressions of hate on social media. For thirty days, Ford stopped advertising on platforms such as Facebook in the United States. In other sectors, the initiative is still under study. Adidas and Reebok will boycott Facebook and Instagram around the world next month. They follow in particular the example of the Starbucks coffee chain, the ice cream maker Ben & Jerry’s, the clothing brands Patagonia and The North Face, the Anglo-Dutch food group Unilever, the telecommunications giant Verizon and Coca-Cola The origin of this campaign is the way Facebook handles inflammatory and hate speech, especially when it is expressed by politicians. The drop that broke the camel’s back is clearly a message from President Trump in which he seems to be calling on protesters protesting against police violence. For weeks, the United States has been submerged in demonstrations against racism and police violence, in response (among other things) to the death of George Floyd. Trump’s post in question was deleted or tagged by other social media like Twitter, but Facebook kept it because, according to Facebook boss Marc Zuckerberg, it was not breaking the rules. Although her company has in the meantime removed several advertisements from the Trump campaign, it has built itself the image of the only technological site that does little or nothing to combat hate messages. Right now, the subject is particularly sensitive in American companies, which want to show their most diverse side through demonstrations and interest in the Black Lives Matter movement. Meanwhile, at Microsoft Meanwhile, an article on the Axios news site shows that Microsoft was ahead of the rest. Starting in May, the company stopped advertising on Facebook and Instagram in the United States. The main reason is not, as in the case of the current boycott, the rules that Facebook may or may not impose on its messages, but the placement of these advertisements. The tech giant was concerned that advertisements might be placed next to “inappropriate content,” wrote Chris Capossela, marketing manager at Microsoft, in an internal message Axios was able to view. It is unknown if there are specific reasons for this, but the message cites “hate speech, pornography, terrorist messages, etc.” as examples of inappropriate messages. In this sense, the boycott of Microsoft is somewhat similar to the previous actions of advertisers against YouTube, where it turned out that their advertisements were shown before and after inappropriate photos of children or videos of radical Muslims. Microsoft wants to make clear that it is not necessarily involved in the boycott, but that it is in contact with Facebook to make changes. It seems logical that the tech giant should be a little more careful. Microsoft is collaborating with Facebook on a few projects. For example, it refers all users of its recently disappeared streaming platform, Mixer, to Facebook Gaming.



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